Late May 2015 fortnight’s favorites

An important Texas artist of the ’30s and ’40s, (W.A.) SLUMBER NICHOL. He first cut records and had shows with the Sons of the Pioneers, then went after WWII to S&G label for the romping « Cotton pickin’ boogie » (# 3003)(vocal Andy Hallcom). He also had the first postwar version of « Cocaine blues », credited to T.J. Arnall. I never knew if this was actually Nichols disguising himself under a nom de plume. The song was reissued on Imperial, then covered by a lot of artists i.e. Roy Hogsed on Coast, later on Capitol, had the best-selling version ; Billy Hughes had his own version on King, among others. Later on Nichols had « Booger red blues » (unheard – sounds promising) on Imperial 8047, and now his track grows cold.

s&g 3003 slumber nichols - cotton pickin' boogie

Cotton pickin’ boogie download

 

slumber nichols

Slumber Nichol

 

 

 

On to Nashville on the M-G-M label by PAUL DAVIS, a nice bopper (great bass) with « Big money » (# 12357)(1956), complete with steel and piano accompaniment over a firm vocal.

 

 

Big moneydownload

mgm 12357 big money

 

 

 

aldus roger seu

Aldus Roger

From Tennessee to Louisiana in Ville Platte : ALDUS ROGER & his Lafayette Playboys. He has « Cajun special » on Swallow 110, from 1959-60. Even for me, French-speaking being, it’s hard to understand all the lyrics !

Cajun special”download
cajun special

From Texas on the Towne House (Sulphur Springs) label (# 11): EUEL HALL & the Rhythm Rockers for two nice bluesy country-rock sides, « Stand in line » and « Blue feeling » . Small but very efficient backing, a prominent lead guitar.

Euel HallBlue feelingdownload

Euel HallStand in linedownload

twne house 11 blue feelingtowne house 11 stand in line

 

 

 

 

Finally probably her first ever record from 1960 on the Zero label (# 107) by LORETTA LYNN, « I’m a honky tonk girl ».
I’m a honky tonk girldownload
zero 107 ht girl

BILLY HUGHES and his Pals of the Pecos (1946-1959)

fargo 1116B low down bluesfargo 1111B It's too lateThis time, the artist, whom we know little of, will be presented mostly by his music and his compositions.

BILLY HUGHES, born Everett Ismael September 14, 1908 at Sallislaw, Oklahoma, settled in the 30s in California following the Okies’ exodus. From 1945, Billy Hughes & his Buccaroos engraved until 1959 a slew of very good hillbilly boppers, some of which became classics, such as “I’m tellin’ you,” “Tennessee Saturday Night” and “Take your hands off it (Birthday cake) ». Many artists took them over, to name a few : Ernest Tubb, Red Foley, Jack Guthrie, Johnny Tyler, Jess Willard, Cowboy Sam Nichols, Bud Hobbs or Skeet’s McDonald – even Tennessean old-timer Kirk McGee. Hughes’ music is usually relaxed, ‘lowdown’ with a Western swing touch, which is normal since Hughes frequented the best artists of the West coast. So he wrote dozens of songs, and hung up during the 60s. He had owned the Fargo label, active in 1946 in Los Angeles (Sam Nichols, Terry Fell, Johnny Tyler) and issued a strange « Atomic sermon » in 1953. He disappeared May 6, 1995 in Horatio, Arkansas.

 

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