Early August 2019 bopping fortnight’s favorites

Hello folks! It’s plain Summer, so if you intend to spare some time with me, here is the early August 2019 selection (10 tracks), mostly from the mid-50s.When you hear them, please get me a comment, or even: ask for more! Here we go.

With such a name, and with regards to the rest of his career, Jay Chevalier sounds a Louisiana artist. However, this is his very first record cut for Cajun, a label out of Virginia. “Rockin’ Roll Angel” (Cajun 101B) is a furious Rockabilly from 1957 – lot of echo on the vocal, a wild steel, a bizarre percussion (is this the bass playing?) and a guitar “a la Travis”. Chevaler went later on Pel (“Bill Cannon”) and Goldband 1105 in 1960 (“Castro Rock”, with political overtones for the Cuba crisis). This record changes hands for $ 300-350.

Al Ferrier and the Bopping’ Billies, the next artist, is also a Louisiana one. Let’s hear him in his first (both sides) issue on Lake Charles’ Goldband 1031. “No No Baby” (legal reissue here, that’s how rare is the original) is a proud Rockabilly bop: fiddle solo, and driving guitar/bass from Spring 1956. The flip side, “I’ll Never Do Any Wrong” is only slowier: a bluesy screaming weeper with 2 fiddle solos ad a guitar more to the fore. The original is sold for $ 100-150.

Cash Box, April 14, 1956

Jack Turner has already a minor Hillbilly bop/Rockablly classic with “Everybody’s Rockin’ (But Me)” ; the flip side is more Hillbilly bop: an uptempo with fiddle and steel. Valued at $ 50-60.

Cash Box April 19, 1956

Buddy Hawk was a Wheeling, W.Va. artist, although the Sheraton label was out of Boston, Ma. He released in late 1954 the surprisingly good (valued only at $ 25-30) double-sider “Honey Baby”/”My Heart’s A-Beatin'” (Sheraton 1003). He was part of the W.C.O.P. Hayloft Jamboree and the record is pure Hillbilly bop.

Cash Box, December 25, 1954

Wayland Seals & The Oil Patch Boys (!) do deliver in 1957 on the Slim Willet owned Winston label (# 1016) a fast Rockabilly. Strong vocal, a lovely guitar and a 6 (or 12?) strings-guitar throughout.”When I’m Gone” is sold for $ 150-200 bucks.

Cash Box August 17, 1957

Th Whitey Knight Orchestra offer on the Wesy coast “Another, Brew, Bartender” on Sage 205 from 1955. A weird, demented fiddle over a nice vocal plus a steel solo. This is a great record, although only valued at $ 15-20.

On the New Mexico Jewel label (# 108), we finish with Wade Jackson (backed on chorus by Weldon & Wanda Rogers) and “Seven Kinds Of Love”. 1960. A ballad, with a very nice ‘modern’ steel; the fiddle is buzzing (played ‘pizzicato’: stupendous – hear it!). Jackson was also on Gallatin’ Tennessee label (“Father Time And Mother Nature”).

Sources: mainly Internet, 45cat and my own archives.