Late September 2013 fortnight’s favorites

Howdy folks! Well it’s been quite some time since I last posted. Lot of work this Summer, down in Marseille (south of France) where I’d set my younger daughter as student in her flat up. Last post (today): an important article on the JACOBY Brothers (TNT and Columbia recordings). Nearly all their output is posted in a new presentation. I hope it will please you. Let me know. By now, for this fortnight, we begin with the guitar player of the Miller Brothers, EDDIE MILLER. He lets his bass player Jim McGraw take the lead on this April 1956 4 Star 1693 issue, “Patty cake man“, a typical 4 Star pano led honky tonker.

4 star 1693-45 eddie miller patty cake man

Another important artist on the West coast was ROCKY BILL FORD, mostly known for his 1951 “Beer drinking blues”, easily found on many compilations. Lesser known is his “Willie Dum Dee” on Gilt-Edge 9 from 1951: typical baritone voice for this fine shuffler.

Rocky Bill Ford: Willie Dum Dee
gilt-edge T-9 willie dum dee

From Joliet, Illinois, 1957, comes JIMMIE LAUDERDALE for a joyful, hopping “Right away, quick! quick!” country-rocker on the Jopz label. Nice guitar.   Right away, quick quick Download jopz jimmie lauderdale   Now BEN BAKER for two tracks on the Cool label from Harrison, NJ. Atmospheric hillbilly bop (one waltz tempo). Lots of echo on the steel and fiddle. Nice tunes: “Tomorrow your leaving“(sic) and “Too late now“. strong>Tommow you_re leaving/span> Download

Too late now
cool 129A ben baker tomorrow your leavingcool 129B too late now

Finally a R&B romper with CECIL GANT and “Nashville jumps“, one of the early sides on Bullet out of Nashville. Enjoy the selections! Bye. Nashville jumps  

bullet 250A nashville jumps

early February 2011 fortnight favorites

Howdy folks! Thanks for visiting my site: you are never less than 35-50 people each day. This is the proof the site is of interest to you, and it gives me in turn enthusiasm and heart to go ahead, search and find more hillbilly bop gems for your own pleasure.

Robert AUTRY INMAN (as christened) from Alabama had begun his musical career as bass player for Cowboy Copas and George Morgan in the latter part of the ’40s. A first recording contract wth Bullet in Nashville occurred in 1949, I will tell more about him in a future feature, when I have gathered enough biographical information (which is actually very sparse for his early career). 1952 saw him inked by Decca records, where he enjoyed moderate success, fine boppers and ballads. In 1956 he embarked freely on the rockabilly bandwagon and cut the classic two-sider “Be-Bop Baby/It Would Be A Doggone Lie“, I’ve chosen the latter side, in my opinion the better of both.

decca 29936 inman it would

tommy durden pic

Tommy Durden late 1990s

From Kansas City, early ’60s, a pleasant jumping country-rock tune on the ‘R‘ label, “There’ll Sure To Be Other Times” by OTHEL SULLIVAN.  He had another 45 on Wonder, which I have not heard. Judging by the RCA custom pressing number, it dates from 1960.

wonder 106

The next artist in question, TOMMY DURDEN, born 1928 in Georgia, had a low-profile career for more than 40 years. Singer and steel-guitar player, he is best known today for being the co-writer of “Heartbreak Hotel”, which gave him comfortable royalties, even if he never wrote a follow-up. Early ’50s saw him , no one knows how, cutting for Houston’s Sol Kahal’s Freedom label, backed by the Westernaires. He had a regional hit, “Crossroads” (rejected by Four Star’s Bill McCall as “too pop”); but fare more interesting was “Hula Boogie“: Durden on vocal, a deft mandolin solo by Boots Gilbert (one-time Durden’s wife, later to have the classic “Take It Or Leave It” on Fortune), and a stinging, hot steel-guitar by the young Herb Remington.

From the Ohio State comes now BOBBY RUTLEDGE. He recorded for the Akron Zipp label some Hillbilly bop sides (“Southern Fried Chicken“); here you have the furious “Go Slow Fatso” from 1956.   zipp 11216 rutledge

BUSTER DOSS & his Arkansas Playboys recorded first for Dallas Talent label this “Graveyard Boogie” in 1949, aimed at horror/halloween followers. Fine steel, call and response format, and a romping piano. He was the uncle of Bob Doss, famed for his Starday sides of the late fifties.

buster doss pictalent 746 doss graveyard

Finally a boogie classic by CECIL GANT – he would die early February 1951 in Nashville, a mere 60 years ago, after a short 6 years musical run and innumerable boogies and ballads. Here I’ve chosen one of his best instrumental tunes, “Screwy Boogie“. Enjoy the selections!

cecil gant pic

early December 2009 fortnight

Hello folks! Here is another slab of boppers to enjoy your ears. We debut with BOB BLUM raucous “Romping Stomping Good time” – the title says it all! Fine steel-guitar. Blum also had “Say it fast” in a more Counry vein. Early in 1936, Dallas, Texas, with the fine original “Texas Sand” by the TUNE WRANGLERS. Charlie Kellogg on vocal and double-bass. This is a used (not abused!) RCA 78 rpm. Down in Mississipi, 1954 (Feature label) with MACK HAMILTON and his great Bopper “I’m A Honky Tonk Daddy”. Black label. Same period, this time on MGM, and up North (Cincinnati) for the prolific JOE ‘CANNONBALL’ LEWIS, a tune later sung by the Maddoxes: “I Wonder If I Can Lose The Blues This Way”.. .A story is en course on JIMMY SIMPSON, a great Country Bopper in his own right, for 2010. Here is his “Blues As I Can be”. Then on to piano blues/boogie with CECIL GANT and “Hogan’s Alley”(King, 1947). Bye!