Late October 2016 bopping Fortnight’s favorites (1945-1964)

Howdy folks ! En route for a new batch of bopping billies, mostly from the late ’40s-early ’50s, with the occasional foray into the early ’60s.

We begin this fortnight with an artist I’d already post a song in March 2011 – that is more than 5 1/2 years. CURLEY curley-cole-picCOLE was a D.J. in Paducah, KY and a multi-instrumentist. Here he delivers on the Gilt-Edge label (a sublabel to Four Star, as everyone knows) the fine bopper « I’m going to roll » (# 5028). It’s a proto-rockabilly in essence, as a train song, from 1952. Cole also had another on Gilt-Edge 5016, « I’m leaving now/For now I’m free » (unheard).

I’m going to rollgilt-edge-5029-curley-cole-im-going-to-roll

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The second artist of this serie also appeared in January 2016, but with different tracks. DON WHITNEY was a D.J. for don whitney picRadio KLCN out of Blytheville, AR. in 1951 when he cut for Four Star « I’m gonna take my time, loving you » (# 1548), again a nice bopper. Later on, he had the romper « G I boogie » (# 1581) in late 1951. Minimal instrumentation (lead guitar, rhythm, bass [it even got a solo], a barely audible fidde) but a lot of excitement. At the beginning of this year I’d posted both his «Red hot boogie » and « Move on blues ». 

I’m gonna take my time, lovin’ you

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G I boogie

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Billboard April 14,1951

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Billboard May 10, 1952

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From Vidalia, GA. Came in 1960 the group Twiggs Co. Playboys for a (great for the era) Hillbilly bopper, « Too many ». Very nice interplay between fiddle and steel (solos) over an assured vocal (Gala # 109). This label is now more known for its rockers (Billy « Echo » Adkinson, The Sabres, Otis White) than for Country records.

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“Too many”download

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Hank Penny

It is useless to present HANK PENNY. To quote the late Breathless Dan Coffey in a very old issue of his magazine « Boppin’ news », and a feature on Jerry Lee Lewis : « If you don’t know what happened to him, you shouldn’t read this mag ! ». From the heyday of his discographical career (which spanned from the late ’30s until 1969), actually of a constant highest level on a par with his popularity, however I was forced to choose two songs he cut for King Records between 1945 and 47, but released on the same 78rpm, King 842, late 1949 or early 50. « Now ain’t you glad dear », cut in Pasadena, CA. in Oct. 1945 at the same session as « Steel guitar stomp » and « Two-noel-boggs-hill-musictimin’ mama », is a fast brillant Western bopper backed in particular by Merle Travis (lead guitar) and Noël Boggs (steel). The other side, recorded in Nashville two years later, and penned by Danny Dedmon (Imperial artist and member of Bill Nettles‘ Dixie Blue Boys) isn’t not at all a slow blues : « Got the Louisiana blues » is equally fast as the B-side, and showcases James Grishaw on guitar, Louie Innis on bass and Bob Foster on steel. A great record.

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billboard Feb. 25, 1950

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Now ain’t you glad dear

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Got the Louisiana blues

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From Atlanta in 1947 comes on piano LEON ABERNATHY & his Homeland Harmony Quartet for « Gospel boogie », a fine call and response romper on the White Church 1084 label.

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Gospel boogie

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Next artist, whom I don’t know much on, is called CLAY ALLEN, from Dallas, Texas. He had two Hillbilly sessions between April and July 1951 for the Decca label (« I can’t keep smiling »,# 46324, is maybe scheduled for a future clay-allen-hill-musicFortnight). He was part of the Country Dudes on the Azalea label in 1959 with the very good rocker « Have a ball »). Later on, he cut several discs between 1961 and 1964 for the Dewey longhorn-547-clay-allen-one-too-many64Groom‘s Longhorn label, « Broken heart » (# 516) for example. I’ve chosen « One too many » (# 547) as his great deep voice backed by a bass chords playing guitar comes for a great effect. Maybe later I’ll post the flipside « I’m changing the numbers on my telephone », but lacking space this time.

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Country Dudes guitar player (Clay Allen?)

One too many

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To round up this serie, here are two tracks by the Atlanta guitar virtuoso JERRY REED, early in career which he began on Capitol Records. From October 1955, there’s the traditional « If the Lord’s willing and the creeks don’t rise » (# 3294), done in a fast Hillbilly bop manner making its way onto Rockabilly. Both steel and fiddle have a good, although jerry-reed-pic-hill-musicshort solo, while Reed is in nice voice. He comes once more, this time recorded in January 1956 : « Mister Whiz » is frankly Rockabilly (# 3429) but the Hillbilly bop feeling is retained : a nice fiddle flows all along, while the guitar player may be (to my ears at least) Grady Martin. Capitol files and Praguefrank are silent on the personnel of Jerry Reed sessions, a pity.

If the Lord’s willing and the creeks don’t rise

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Mister Whiz

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Sources: mostly 78rpm-world or my archives; John E. Burton YouTube chain (Twiggs Co. Playboys); various researches on the Net. Countrydiscographies.com (Praguefrank) for Hank Penny and Jerry Reed data.

Late September 2014 fortnight’s favourites

Howdy folks, back from holydays. All the selections will be out by obscure artists. Once more uninspired, only music!
ED JUNOT on the Robstown, Texas O-T-O (One-Thousand-One) label comes first with « Give you’re love back to me » [sic]. Uptempo hillbilly fiddle led.

Ed JunotGive you’re love back to medownload

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Bill GuytonI’ve got a little time for lovingdownload

 

Then BILL GUYTON on the Pride 3000 label, « I’ve got a little time for loving ». Guyton had been vocalist on Curley Rash « Humble road boogie » (Macy’s). This is medium hillbilly bop with a touch of Starday feel.

 

Lefty Pritchett “Just an ole has been” download
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An haunting « Just an ole has been » on Bama (not the Alabama label) # 0001 by LEFTY PRITCHETT. Hillbilly bop Memphis style.

Then the most recent track of the selection on Toppa 1098 from 1961 : «All those lies» by ELTON TRAVIS. Uptempo Country rocker.

JOHNNY GITTAR offers on High Time 173 « San Antonio boogie », obviously a Texas recording. Medium boogie guitar led and heavy drums.

Finally a train song, « I’m going to roll » by CURLY COLE on Gilt-edge 5029. Nice guitar and piano solo.
Elton TravisAll those liesdownload

Johnny GittarSan Antonio boogiedownload

Curley Cole, “Im going to rolldownload

 

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early March 2011 fortnite favorites

Howdy folks! Here is a new batch of Hilbilly Bop goodies, even the odd Rock’n’Roll!

We are beginning on the West Coast with CASEY SIMMONS and his “Juke Box Boogie” on Crystal records from 1950. Call and response format, fine saxophone and a lot of electric guitar. The whole thing romps along lovely!

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Eddie Jackson

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Fortune records offered many a Hillbilly Bop song in its 100 serie. EDDIE JACKSON, famous for his “Rock and Roll Baby“, turns up there with “Baby Doll“, dominated by a good piano.

Sol Kahal’s Macy’s Records had many fine discs, either in Blues field, either in early Hillbilly bop, i.e. by Ramblin’ Tommy Scott or Harry Choates. ART GUNN & his Arizona Playboys cut the decent “Cornbread Boogie” in 1949. Fine harmonica throughout.    macy's 106A art gunn cornbread boogie

They also had on the same label “Boogie Woogie Blues” (for a future fortnight), and later, on own Gunn label Arga in 1958, the superior “Pickin’ and A-Singin’“.

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Cowboy Sam Nichols

Cowboy Sam Nichols had written (and recorded for Stanchell) the classic “That Wild And Wicked Look In Your Eye“, before he got a contract with MGM records. It was early to mid-fifties and the beginning of truck drivers‘ songs (Terry Fell for example); here the shuffle “Keep Your Motor Hot” from 1954. No label scan available, as I sold the 78 rpm, having only kept the music! Nichols was backed by West coast top musicians: Porky Freeman on guitar, Jesse Ashlock on fiddle, Red Murrell on rhythm and Curley Cochran on steel.

From trucks to trains. Grady CURLEY COLE was a resident D.J. in Paducah, KY, but he cut his fine “I‘m Going To Roll” for L.A. Gilt-Edge label. Nothing more is known about him. Let’s stay in Kentucky for TOMMY HOLMES, backed by Pat Kingery & the Kentuckians. A certain Mr. Vance asked Holmes a record for his politician career ca. 1954. The tune “Jam On The Lower Shelf” is pretty average, mostly when you hear Holmes six years later in an out-and-out Rocker on the Cherry label, “Wha-Chic-Ka-Noka“. Enjoy the selections!

tommy holmes piccherry 112 holmes