Early November 2020 bopping fortnight’s favorites

This is a regular feature in the bi-monthly “bopping favorites”. As you surely noticed it, American English is not my natural language an I’m trying hard to be understood. My apologies to everyone reading those pages.But, remember, Music is first!

First WINNIE PARKER & the Rhythm Maniacs on the Ruby label (# 350) from Hamilton, Oh. She released on 1957 « Down Boy Boogie ». It’s a Gene Vincent sequel (references to « Bluejean Bop »). lovely rhythm and bass, a very agreaable steel solo and a fabulous bluesy guitar.

The veteran JOHNNY BOND had a long and rich recording career, which out chose the fast « Mean Mama Boogie ». Straight honky tonk with harmonica solo (Jerry Adler) and the legendary Noel Boggs on steel, released in Jan. 1950.

BILL WHITTLEY in 1960 on the Texas Blue Bonnet label # 1453. « I’m A Rich Man » is a mid-paced bopper with sparse instrumentation (guitar and bass). « Why Did You Leave Me » is a faster side, this time wih steel added.

From Wisconsin on the Rebel label (# 819) from 1959. BOBBY HODGE & The Rainbow Rangers
has « Gonna Take My Guitar ». A nice vocal, a great steel, & fiddle solo. All for a tight llittle combo near to Rockabilly. Hodge had went earlier on the Nashville label (# 5014) for the very similar «Carolina Bound ». He can be found on Golden Ring too (“Alligator Man”)

« Tears In My Eyes » on the Capo label 45-002 (1960) on the West coast by WAYNE Red » YEAGER (1934-2015). Ralph Mooney is on steel for this gentlle rhythm ballad. Capo had connections with another California small label : Sundown out of Pico, Ca.

On the West coast Fable label (#573) BILLY MACKLIN offers the moving « Knock On Wood » : steel, fiddle and a very nice vocal from 1957.

sources : my own archives ; 45cat ; YouTube (Bobby Hodge, Bill Whittley).

Late April 2019 bopping fortnight’s favorites

Hello, folks ! Hello to past visitors ; hi ! to new ones. This is the late April 2019 fortnight’s selection.

Henry McPeak

Let’s begin with a Starday custom record issued mid-1959 by HENRY McPEAK on the HG label (# 771). McPeak was born 1929 in Snowville, Va. « I Feel Like Yelling » is a fast bopper : lots of guitar ( a great solo picking), an assured vocal (which reminds me of The Lonesome Drifter, alias Tommy Johnson). McPeak had another disc the next year on HG # 851 with « When You Kissed Me »: very different, more melodic. Again that good guitar, even a Rockabilly solo. The record goes on sale from $ 280 to 380.

Bob Burton

BOB BURTON next (aided by Rex Jennings and Shorty Ashford) delivers on Harry Glenn’s owned Mar-Vel 952 (issued 1954 in Hammond, IN) the good « Forty Acres Of My Heart » : a fast fiddle solo and a short steel solo. The three musicians join unison in the chorus. Of course, Burton had other good records on Mar-Vel as « Boogie Woogie Baby Of Mine » (Mar-Vel 951) or « Tired Of Rockin’ » (Mar-Vel 953, 1956).

Johnny Dollar

Next was issued in 1961 on the D label # 1185. Good bopper is « Crawling Back To You » by JOHNNY DOLLAR, great steel led on a fast number. Dollar (his real name), despite many a good record, never got it big, and remained a minor artist. He had several occupations : truck driver, life insurance salesman, lumber yard man among others when he could. He was also dee-jaying (thanks Merle Kilgore) on Shreveport’s KZAE, and finally cut for D, aided by Shelby Singleton.

Johnny Bond

An oldie (1950) on Columbia 20704 now : JOHNNY BOND was a constant Bopper in the early ’50s with things like this « Mean Mama Boogie », cut on the West coast. Great harmonica by Jerry Adler, a little guitar by Jerry Scoggins ; Bond is in particularly good voice.

Jim Oertling

On the Hammond label and as late as 1965, here’s JIM OERTLING & the Bayou Boys for two selections. « Old Moss Back » (# 267) has a terrific guitar intro, an urgent vocal and a fine guitar solo. « Back Forty » (# 268) is a mid-tempo with nice vocal and a Rockabilly guitar solo.

Tommy Elliott

Finally back in the early 50s with TOMMY ELLIOTT and the Line Riders. « Same Dog Bit Me » was released on Texas Time label (# 130) and is a hillbilly bopper, fast fiddle-led with a nice upright bass.

Sources : YouTube ; Notes to D Singles vol. 1 (BF) ; the autobiography of Johnny Bond (a JEMF book) ; «Ohio river » for Bob Burton details ; 78-worlds for Tommy Elliott.

JOHNNY BOND

Johnny Bond had several successful facets to a career that lasted over 30 years. As a member of the Jimmy Wakely Trio and as a session musician, he was an important support musician in dozens of B Westerns, working alongside Wakely, Tex Ritter, and Johnny Mack Brown. As a songwriter, he was responsible for several compositions that became country standards, including “Cimarron,” “I Wonder Where You Are Tonight,” “Conversation With a Gun,” “Tomorrow Never Comes,” and “I’ll Step Aside,” which became hits for everyone from Billy Vaughn & His Orchestra to Johnny Rodriguez. He also contributed mightily to the recorded music of Wakely, Ritter, and other country stars of the 1940s and 1950s. And his own recordings — which included work with such luminaries as Merle Travis — were popular from the 1940s onward, and included several hits, but it wasn’t until the 1960s that he had the biggest record of his career, “Ten Little Bottles.” (more…)